Does It Need to Be Said? Don’t Lie.

I recently watched Liz Keoghs “Let’s be honest…” YouTube that she did at the goto; conference. It was a fun and engaging talk, but I was frustrated and, frankly, surprised that there are companies or individuals that need to be told don’t lie. She used examples from previous positions to illustrate her many points, but there were two that stuck out for me (well, most of the points were salient, but these were the two that had the most impact on me).

The first was her statement that we’re no longer finding better ways to build software, we already know how to build software, we’re finding better ways to discover. Liz had the sentence from the agile manifesto on screen when she said this. Now, while I’m still not entirely convinced that a nearly 12 year old document is as valid now as it was when it was written, I believe that, if any of it is true, then that be is – we’re still finding ways to build better software. The constant evolution of our industry is testament to that. Don’t get me wrong, we’re much better at it now than we’ve ever been, but it would be arrogant to announce that we’ve reached the pinnacle of software development. Even if you’re a super-duper, high perfoming, cross-functional team, if you stop trying to improve, you’ll rot from the inside out.

This doesn’t mean that the rest of Liz’s statement is wrong, we’re also finding better ways to discover what our software should do, the fact that BDD is now more popular than ever means we’re trying harder to find out more about our products, not just how we build them.

The other thing Liz said in her talk was about user stories and how, we’re lying if they’re not actual stories for the user. Gojko said the same thing in his angry Monday blog post and it got me to thinking. Gojkos was a better example in that “As a user, I want to register, so I can use the site.” is probably a lie – no user ever wants to registers, it’s a necessary evil we perpetrate over and over again in order to provide some persistence for the users’ experience – however, we have the story because we think we should. It might be better phrased as “As marketing, I want the user to register, so I can send them email” or similar (Gokjo has other examples).

But, for me this misses the point. The stories are a catalyst for conversation, what they actually say should really be irrelevant. They could say “Login” and just a a placeholder. This will force the people involved to talk about what that means and how they should build it. It’s this conversation that needs the to be focussed and honest, not the story card. It also needs people to think differently about how they go about the discovery process and this, for me at least, is key to what both Liz and Gojko are saying.

I believe that, for the most part, we lie without knowing we’re lying (is that even lying?). We make verbal assertions about thing X to move us passed that to get to thing Y. The danger then, is that you don’t revisit thing X to work out whether or not your assumption was correct. Do the quickest, most expeditious thing to move you from nothing to something in order to find out if you were right, if you spend too long worrying about whether your story card says the right thing you’re going to miss out. After all, it’s all about the users, get it in front of them and let them tell if you’re lying.

Finally, I believe in starting from a position of trust, this means that I cannot entertain the idea that people are lying until it’s proven they are. The people around me (and, hopefully, you) don’t lie. They’re professionals and adults and shouldn’t lie. If we ever find ourselves in a position where we have to point this fact out at a conference, we’ve got much bigger, darker problems than what we write on story cards.

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